Difference between revisions of "An open-source bee for a poisonous environment"

From The Soft Protest Digest
Jump to navigation Jump to search
 
Line 7: Line 7:
 
== Links to the podcast ==
 
== Links to the podcast ==
 
<ul>
 
<ul>
<li>🔊“An open-source bee for a poisonous environment” — to come…
+
<li>🔊[https://soundcloud.com/thesoftprotestdigest/an-open-source-bee-for-a-poisonous-environment-with-beekeeper-and-biologist-julien-perrin/ “An open-source bee for a poisonous environment”]
 
:Dubbed english version 🇬🇧 (~35min)</li>
 
:Dubbed english version 🇬🇧 (~35min)</li>
 
<li>🔊[https://soundcloud.com/thesoftprotestdigest/une-abeille-open-source-pour-un-environnement-empoisonne-1/ “Une abeille open-source pour un environnement empoisonné”]
 
<li>🔊[https://soundcloud.com/thesoftprotestdigest/une-abeille-open-source-pour-un-environnement-empoisonne-1/ “Une abeille open-source pour un environnement empoisonné”]

Latest revision as of 14:25, 14 February 2020

The cover of the podcast
The Buckfast bee

In parallel to the service of “Spore“ & “Pollen” for Le Banquet held at contemporary art museum Palais de Tokyo[1] on November 20th, 2019 as part of Futur, ancien, fugitif, an exhibition dedicated to the “french art scene”, we released a podcast titled “An open-source bee for a poisonous environment”. This podcast was first recorded in french with beekeeper and biologist Julien Perrin. It is now also available in an english dubbed version.

Produced by The Soft Protest Digest, this interview was followed by an Umwelt[2], a text written as seen from the eyes of a bee. This text was written and then evaluated, word by word, by Fanny Rybak, biologist and researcher at the french CNRS institute, specialized in inter-species communication. Broadcasted as a reccording in its french version by actress Garance Kim during the event, it is now available also in english, read by french performer Nolwenn Salaün.

Links to the podcast

Isolated track

  • 🔊 “Umwelt of the bee
    (English version: N. Salaun | French version: G. Kim)
    Sound piece, from the point of view of the bee. (~3mins) 🇬🇧🇫🇷

Transcript ENGLISH VERSION 🇬🇧 (dubbed)

Introduction

You are listening to, “An open source bee for a poisonous environment”. This podcast is produced by The Soft Protest Digest.
The hyper-industrialization of our food systems is leading the biodiversity of our ecosystems to collapse. An excellent witness — and the key example of this crisis — is the case of the bee.
To address this issue we took the train through the suburbs of Paris, to the region of “Essonne”, west of the capital, to meet beekeeper and biologist Julien Perrin.
Julien breeds Buckfast bees, which can be considered a “rustic” species — which, in other words, means “resistant to all the disasters she has to face”. Julien works in collaboration with a large community of beekeepers to multiply these open-source bees. According to him, the bee must remain "a common" which no industry must take possession of, to avoid at all costs falling into the pitfall of privately owed seeds and breeds.
The indifference towards the bee also relies on the fact that humans have actually very little empathy towards insects. And indeed, there is a real misconception about what social insects are and how they think. Indeed, we often believe that insects are intelligent as a group. And yet, they have an intelligence of their own.
To illustrate it, we have described through an umwelt, ergo at the first person, the activity of a bee. This text, which will punctuate our conversation with Julien Perrin, was written by the collective and then evaluated, word by word, by Fanny Rybak, biologist and researcher at the french CNRS institute, specialized in inter-species communication. It is read by french performer Nolwenn Salaün.
We hope you will enjoy this episode.

Julien:

My name is Julien Perrin, I'm a beekeeper since 2009 and my farm is called HappyApi. I’ve always been interested in spreading information about bees because it is, first, a passion and second, I think it's important to spread the word on what responsible beekeeping practices can be. You can also find many articles on my website which is: apihappy.fr.
I’ve been breeding Buckfast bees since 2009 and my job is therefore to multiply bees that are “rustic”. So what does rustic mean? It means that they do not need chemicals or other things to live on. This work I do so that beekeepers can have freedom and not depend on the chemical industry or other things.
Although I started working by using the “black bee”, I work today with the “Buckfast” breed. The reason being that there is a community around it. It is an international community but even more so European, thanks to which beekeepers can freely exchange bees, which makes it possible to work on projects rather efficiently.
Our main project at the moment is to multiply bees that are resistant to a parasite called the Varroa that sucks the fat out of the bees, which makes them weak and infects them with viruses. What we are trying to do is simply to multiply bees that are able to handle that by nature.

The Soft Protest Digest:

Maybe we can go a little bit more into detail. You've mentioned the Varroa issue, perhaps we can take this opportunity to list all the challenges that bees are facing today. Which problems are bees affected by?

Julien:

To be honest, bees are facing multiple problems. The first problem that pollinators as a whole and bees in particular are facing is the artificialization of the environment.
Today, there is no longer a great diversity of habitats, therefore very little diversity of flowers. The decline of biodiversity leaves us with large plains covered with one single type of flower or plant, and sometimes there are no flowers at all. Therefore, instead of having a diversified and constant diet, the bee is left with an unstable source of feed. To give you an image, it's a bit like eating only salad. Salad may be good for you, but if you can only eat that, you face a problem of nutritional balance. You have to eat a variety of products. And note that this lack of diversity in food is even stronger for pollinators.
Another problem we have is the competition with the chemical industry. Articles have shown, for example, that the mobility of the sperm of male bees decreases under the influence of certain chemicals which, as a result, directly affects the ability of bees to reproduce. But these products can also have an impact on their ability to locate themselves in the environment. Knowing that a small bee can pollinate as far as 10km away from her hive, she also needs to be able to remember her environment to be able to come back. If her memory is disturbed, she can simply get lost which is something that can have a devastating impact on the colonies.
Globalization has also fostered a multitude of new problems. In beekeeping today, thinking that local bees make the most sense for their environment is wrong. Globalization subjects local bees to problems they do not know how to handle. The most notorious example is the Varroa, which is a kind of mite, a crab that sucks the blood of bees. To give you an image it's a bit like in the movie Alien, the little thing that sucks the blood out of people, it’s not that nice.
There are also other parasites, smaller ones this time like bacterias or fungis that will disrupt the development of the new bees. The American foulbroods among others completely ravage colonies of bees.
Bigger, we have the Asian hornets who stand in front of the hives to stress out the bees inside. These hornets will not actually eat the bees but scare them to death. The bees will be so frightened that they won't leave the hive to search for food anymore and will therefore die of hunger.
In the end we face a global problem: climate change. You may not necessarily realize its impact if you live in a city but, in the countryside, we can tell. Species of trees which were adapted to our climate, suffer today from droughts and heat waves. I think the french national forest association worked on a model to foresee the evolution of beech trees in France. The result of the study is disastrous. By 2050, the beech tree which is quite widespread in France, would have almost disappeared. In the end, the bee also has a hard time coping with these changes.

The Soft Protest Digest:

Do we know where the varroa comes from exactly?

Julien:

Yes. It is a parasite that used to live among another species of bees called Apis Cerana. This bee has been living together with the varroa for a long time, which allowed her to develop defense mechanisms. It is, by the way, a bee that produces very little honey, if any, because it uses a lot of energy to defend itself.
The fact is that, in order to produce more honey, productive honey species such as Apis Mellifera were exported to Asian countries. There, the varroa infected these clean bees which re-migrated to Europe through Russia and eastern European countries, landing back in France around 1986. So the varroa has been in France for about thirty years now. If you consider evolution, it is quite a recent invasion, which explains why local bees have such difficulties to deal with it. My job will be, therefore, to identify the bees that are naturally resistant to the parasite, and to multiply them in order to not have to rely on chemicals, which would artificially answer to the problem.

The Soft Protest Digest:

You mentioned the migration from Asia. Could you perhaps speak a little more specifically of this issue of “migration”, what we call in french “transhumance” of bees, and how bees are exploited to exclusively pollinate crops?

Julien:

Indeed, it is something that is and may even unfortunately become the future of beekeeping. Today we realize that biodiversity is drastically collapsing. To give you an idea, 2% of the population of pollinators die each year. 2% is the equivalent to the number of victims of the Spanish flu. On a human level, this crisis was a disaster. This is happening every year, year after year, to pollinators.
If we consider the biomass of pollinators, we lost about 76% of it. You can see it every summer when you go on holiday. A few years ago, your car would be covered with crushed mosquitoes and other pollinators. Today, your car would be as clean as it was when you left. The reason being that there are no pollinators anymore. They’re nearly all dead. And if we consider the diversity of species, we have almost lost half of it. This is the marker of how problematic our environment actually is. And since pollinators no longer exist, there is now a problem of pollination. And it is a fundamental issue because a third of our food depends on pollinated plants. This is a major problematic that we have to adress, especially since pollinators have an impact that is also eco-systemic — in other words, they contribute to the planet’s ecology by being responsible for the life of other species of plants, birds or even fish.
“Transhumance” means that, as we are facing a lack of resources, beekeepers must now run after them so that their bees do not simply die of hunger. They have to constantly move their hives, in search for food. Meanwhile, farmers must now call on beekeepers to help them pollinate their own crops. This is a phenomenon which is still rather rare in France but is huge in the United States. A beekeeper who will help pollinate almond trees in California will come to travel around the whole country, allowing other crops like cranberries for instance, to also be pollinated.

Julien off-mic:

We harvest 200 queens. We pick out 200 queens in 200 cases every Tuesday. On Wednesday we set up 200 royal cells across our hives. On Friday, we loosen up the cells. On Saturdays we transplant them. And on Sunday we inseminate them, and we do that every week throughout harvesting season…

The Soft Protest Digest:

Now that we've discussed your work as well as the problems that you're trying to solve through your Buckfast bee operation, I would like to talk about the overall life cycle of the bee. The idea would be to foster a sort of empathy towards the bee. Because, in the end, empathy is also a way to make people want to act and take a stand. We can, perhaps, start there: an egg is placed inside one of the cells of the honeycomb. It is the egg of a working bee. What happens then?

Julien:

An egg is placed inside one of the cells of the honeycomb and it's an egg that is not yet a worker or a queen. It will grow for 3 days, hatch and then be fed with royal jelly. It will first be a larvae which will form a kind of cocoon, like butterflies do. Inside the cocoon will be a nymph, who will grow and turn into an adult bee. This adult bee will become either a worker (the classic bees we all know), or a queen (depending on the amount of royal jelly she will have been fed with). In their early stages, each bee will be fed royal jelly, then after 3 days a switch will take place and a large majority of the larvaes will be fed with a mixture of pollen and honey while the queens will be fed exclusively with royal jelly.
It's absolutely incredible to witness that a certain type of feed can completely condition the genes and alter the development of a particular bee. It's as if we would eat gingerbread and become, all of a sudden, really strong. I must not have eaten enough!

The Soft Protest Digest:

(sic) Of all the substances that bees produce as feed, we can find, if I understand it correctly: royal jelly, honey and pollen. We know that honey comes from the nectar of flowers and pollen as well. But where does royal jelly come from?

Julien:

Actually, bees eat exclusively pollen and honey. However, they will produce a substance with their glands which is, in fact, royal jelly. Our own body produces many substances: pancreatic juices for digestion, saliva to digest starch, etc ... Just as well, bees produce a substance which serves as a source of enriched feed, which helps queens to grow properly.

The Soft Protest Digest:

These bees that produce royal jelly are called nurses. Can you tell to us about the various roles that worker bees can have throughout their lives?

Julien:

There is actually various arrays of specialization inside the hive. There is a sort of caste system which relies on the sex and types of bees. We have the classic worker bee: she works on producing food. There is the queen, who’s function is only to lay eggs. She does not have any power other than that, she does not decide anything. We can also find males who’s function is to allow reproduction. Their only task will be to fertilize the queens, at a given time.
Time also plays a role, especially among worker bees. When young, just out of their cocoon, they will become nurses. Then they will go through several stages which, once older, will lead them to become foragers or even explorers. The most specialized forager bees will be the ones which will locate new sources of food.
The reason why I briefly introduced all of these roles is because it is interesting to see how evolution as naturally led older bees to be the ones taking risks outdoors. And vice-versa, taking care of the inside of the hive and the close surroundings of the colony is a job for younger bees. It is a beautiful thing.

The Soft Protest Digest:

At what age will the bee leave the hive to go explore its environment and look for new sources of feed?

Julien:

There is 21 days between the laying of the egg and the birth of a working bee. And another 21 days between their birth and them leaving the nursery. These numbers are relative of course, the hive has a certain plasticity. If we were to remove all the foragers from the hive for instance, young bees may become foragers straight away and vice versa, if we were to remove all the young bees, old bees could become nurses again. But in general they stay 21 days in the nursery, 21 days inside the hive and usually around 21 days outside, foraging in the wild. Their lifespan can vary. It can depend on the weather, the environment, the season. Bees that are born in the harvesting season, therefore in June/July, will have a relatively short life because they will work a lot. On the other hand, the bees that will be born at the end of the summer and during the autumn will most likely survive the winter. A beautiful thing for instance is that small bees can be raised at a certain temperature inside the hive. Depending on the temperature, their genes will be altered, and their metabolism will be impacted. Bees born in the winter will be born with more fat for example. In the end, the environment really plays a specific part in the development of the bee and its resistance to it. These are mechanisms of anticipation that have been selected, naturally, over time.

The Soft Protest Digest:

We can maybe go further into details and talk about some of the other roles that the bee can have. For instance, I find it incredible to consider that bees produce wax with their abdomen, which they use to build their own habitat with.

Julien:

Indeed, worker bees can carry out several other tasks. Nurse bees will take care of the nursery and the "baby bees". Some others’s job will be to clean the hive. And, you’re right, we can also find “builder bees” that call on a very interesting mechanism.
Bees feed largely on sugar. It is as if we mainly drinked soda. For humans, to consume too much sugar causes a serious problem which is called obesity. For bees however, evolution has made it possible to stay clear of this problem by turning the excess fat into a product called wax. It is from this fat that bees build the combs of the hive, as well as collectively vote for the potential replacement of the queen. Indeed, bees have the ability to choose to replace the queen if needed. If the current queen is less efficient than it used to be, each worker bee will then stack its own piece of wax to form a cell with a specific shape. When the deficient queen will lay an egg in it, the nurses will only feed the larvae with royal jelly, which will turn her into a new queen.
Wax is an fascinating material. It can carry vibrations along the hive which allow bees to communicate with each other. This is, by the way, a serious problem nowadays because wax can sometimes be synthesized with other products which can interfere with the communication system of the hive. This can have a detrimental impact on the growth of the larvas or the strength of the honeycomb, etc. It is a very big problem that we have today.

The Soft Protest Digest:

While we’re on the subject of wax. We could also talk about how the hive is used by the bees as a sort of map, which is fascinating. By performing various sorts of dances, it allows them to give very precise information on where to find the exact location of a source of food. Thanks to that, they can concentrate the efforts of the hive on one particular sport. Is that what it is?

Julien:

Yes. The wax is specifically formed to give shape to the honey combs. It’s a beautiful thing. Bees will glue together small pieces of wax around them to form circles. These circles, pushed against one another, will give shape to hexagons. It's a bit like bubbles of soap in a bathtub. It is a stable architecture that is formed through a thermodynamic process. Bees do not, per say, give shape to the rays of the honeycomb. They rely on the properties of the wax which has a particular melting point which allows it to form these complex structures. Wax relies on a subtle balance of parameters. It must be plastic, but not too much, as it may collapse. That is why supporting natural wax is fundamental.
On the top of the honeycomb is a sort of relatively thick tube of wax. It allows vibrations to pass. Knowing that there is very little light in the hive, this tube will serve as a communication cable. The bees will, as you said, indicate a location by performing a dance which they will spread in the hive. These dances are designed in accordance with several factors. When the bees come out of the hive they can locate the position of the sun. When they come back to the hive, they communicate the position of the source of food in relation to the position of the sun. Knowing that there is no sun in the hive, they will consider that the sun is the top of the frame. The bee will fly in the shape of an 8, and the center axis of the 8 will indicate the direction in relation to the sun, and the number of buzzing she will perform on the axis will indicate the distance. Why buzzing? We can understand that a bee who went very far has flown for a long time and moved a lot. Therefore, she expresses this effort in her dance: “you have to move a lot, a lot, a lot”. The bee will also have to inform the others on the quality of the feed. She will keep a small drop of nectar in her mouth that she will make the other bees taste so that they can evaluate if the nectar is good or not. These are systems of control which allow them to protect themselves from toxic substances.

The Soft Protest Digest:

Can you tell us what pollen and honey actually are?

Julien:

Honey actually comes from a nectar produced by plants. This nectar is a sweet juice which is relatively rich in water. Bees will bring this nectar inside the hive, enrich it with enzymes, then dry it by ventilating it, which will reduce its amount of water. This process will produce a syrup which is still slightly alive: honey. Honey can also come from other sources than flowers: from honeydew. Honeydew are small drops of a sweet juice that aphids and small scale insects produce by sucking the sap of trees or plants which bees will later harvest to produce honey. The reason I say that honey is a product that is alive is that it contains a variety of enzymes that require special conditions to be active.
There is also another product that is even more alive: pollen. Pollen is the equivalent of the sperm of flowers. Bees will add honey to it to form small solid balls. What is interesting is that they later add a variety of micro-organisms to it, mainly bacterias and yeast, which will actually ferment the pollen, kind of like sauerkraut. That will allow the pollen to be digested better and to be richer in nutrients. For bees, pollen is the equivalent of proteins, like a steak for us. But it also is a whole microflora. When you drink apple cider vinegar and you see what is called “a mother”, this yogurt looking thing floating at the surfance, it is actually a source of micro-organisms which is essential for our body to fonction well. Likewise, pollen is going to be the way for bees to enrich their microflora.

The Soft Protest Digest:

Now that we've delved into the life cycle of a working bee, I'd like to go back to the role the queen plays in the hive. Could you tell me about the role of queen, starting from this vote you mentioned? What does she become after she comes out of the cocoon?

Julien:

As we saw earlier, a queen is a female egg that could either turn into a worker or a queen but which is fed exclusively with royal jelly for one simple reason: the shape of its cell. Instead of growing in 21 days, she will develop in 16 days and will be born a virgin. After a week, she will come out of the hive to first understand where the hive is in relation to its environment; and second, to be fertilized.
She will be fertilized in distinctive areas where she will meet with the males. For that particular purpose, she will be followed by a sort of escort who will accompany her through the fertilization phase.
When we talk about fertilization, it's not quite right actually: it is in fact, a copulation. As we saw earlier, fertilization is done at the level of the egg. The males will copulate with the queens and their penises, which are almost as big as their body, will stay stuck. They will therefore withdraw themselves, tear away their penis and die. The queens will then tear each penis out in order to be able to be fertilized multiple times, on average twelve times (it may vary). There is a real competition at play between the males. By leaving their penises in the females, they actually block the access to the queen’s reproductive system to other males. They will also block the migration of the sperm of the contestants into the queen's body by mixing their sperm with mucus.
When returning to the hive, the sperm collected by the queen will migrate to a small internal pocket called the “spermathec”. That's why using the term fertilization is wrong. Fertilization happens when the sperm comes into contact with the egg. This is not what’s happening here. The queen collects and stores sperm that she will distribute, drop by drop, throughout her life. This migration of the sperm to the spermathec will take from 3 days to a week, depending on the weather. The queen will then start laying up to three thousand eggs a day, throughout her life. The queen is, in the end, only a machine to lay eggs. And she will showcase the quality of her work by spreading a very pleasant smell around the hive. This smell becomes a signal of presence.
But as time goes by, the sperm will lose in quality and run out. The queen will try, with less and less success, to inseminate the eggs which will become harder, leading her to lose her smell. It is therefore in these conditions that the workers will decide to replace her with a younger one.

The Soft Protest Digest:

How long does the queen live for in general?

Julien:

That's something that we've really seen evolve in the last years. In the past, queens could live up to 5 years. That's what my grandfather used to tell me. Today they live from 2 to 3 years tops. Why? For the simple fact that they are facing an environment that is getting more and more tricky to deal with. There is a very noticeable drop in sperm quality, and it is the case for humans too. The sperm which queens keep in their spermathec is weak which leads the colonies to replace their queens more often.

The Soft Protest Digest:

Finally. The bee seems, in the end, to be a “domesticated pollinator”. You were telling me about what sounded earlier like an actual domestication, since you manage their reproduction as well. Does the bee and beekeeping in general have a positive or a negative impact on other pollinators?

Julien:

There are several different ways to look at it. Indeed, bees can sometimes be in competition with other pollinators. But in any case, everything that beekeepers do to preserve the environment, and their bees of course, will have a positive impact on all the other pollinators.
From a biodiversity perspective, there is something that is major at play, even if we are only talking about the bee. Indeed, if tomorrow we are left with a bee produced by large bio-technological companies which is then sold to beekeepers around the world, as it is the case with wheat or corn for instance, we will then be left with a disastrous biodiversity. And that's what we are working against. We want a diversity of breeders to select a bee that meets the needs of a particular environment and to multiply it for the community. It requires a lot of energy but it allows to have a variety of points of view which can guarantee a true genetic diversity. We must prevent big bio-technological corporations to control the bee.

Outro

Thank you for listening to “An open source bee for a poisonous environment". You can find this episode as well as other podcasts, on the podcast app or on SoundCloud with the keyword "The Soft Protest Digest". You can also visit our wikipedia www.thesoftprotestdigest.org for more information.

Transcript ORIGINAL VERSION (french) 🇫🇷

Introduction

Vous écoutez, “Une abeille open-source pour un environnement empoisonné”. Un podcast produit par The Soft Protest Digest.
C’est indiscutable, l’hyper industrialisation de nos systèmes alimentaires anéanti la biodiversité de nos écosystèmes. Un excellent témoin — et l’exemple type de cet effondrement — est celui de l’abeille.
Pour aborder cette problématique nous nous sommes rendus en Essonne, dans la banlieue Parisienne à la rencontre de l'apiculteur et biologiste Julien Perrin.
Julien élève des abeilles Buckfast, une espèce rustique, autrement dit résistante à tous les désastres qui lui font face. En collaboration avec une grande communauté d'apiculteurs, il travaille à multiplier des lignées d’abeilles que l’on peut considérer comme libres, ou open source. Selon lui, l’abeille doit rester “un commun” dont aucune industrie ne doit prendre possession, pour éviter à tout prix de tomber dans l'écueil des semences et des races propriétaires.
L’indifférence face au déclin de l’abeille répond aussi un manque manifeste d’empathie de l’humain face à l’insecte. Il y a, en vérité, une grande méconnaissance des insectes sociaux que l’on pense intelligents seulement par effet de groupe. Et pourtant, ces insectes ont une intelligence propre.
Pour l’illustrer, nous avons raconté sous la forme d’un umwelt, c’est-à-dire à la première personne, la conduite d’une abeille. Ce texte, qui viendra ponctuer notre entretient, a été écrit puis évalué au mot près par Fanny Rybak, biologiste et chercheuse au CNRS spécialisée dans la communication inter-espèces. Il est lu par la comédienne Garance Kim.
Bon épisode.

Julien Perrin :

Donc je m’appelle Julien Perrin, je suis apiculteur depuis 2009 et mon exploitation c'est Api Api. Je suis toujours intéressé par diffuser l'information sur les abeilles parce que c'est une passion et que je trouve que c'est aussi important de diffuser une apiculture qui a du sens. Vous pouvez d’ailleurs retrouver pleins d’articles sur mon site qui est : apihappy.fr.
Donc moi je suis éleveur en Buckfast depuis 2009 et, en fait, mon travail ça va être de multiplier des abeilles qui sont rustiques. Donc ça veut dire quoi ? Ce sont des abeilles qui ne meurent pas, qui ne vont pas avoir besoin de produits chimiques ou d'autres choses pour vivre. Tout ça pour que les apiculteurs puissent avoir des exploitations qui soient les plus libres possible, qu'ils ne soient pas dépendants de la chimie ou d'autres choses.
Je travaille avec une race qui est la Buckfast, même si j'ai commencé à travailler avec l’abeille noire. La raison pour laquelle j’aime beaucoup la Buckfast est qu’il y a une communauté autour d’elle. Une communauté internationale mais surtout européenne, grace à laquelle les apiculteurs s’échangent des abeilles et ce de manière libre, ce qui permet d'avancer assez vite sur les projet.
Le projet fort du moment c’est de multiplier des abeilles qui sont résistantes au Varroa, un parasites qui suce le tissu adipeux des abeilles, ce qui les rend faible et leur transmet des virus. Ce que nous essayons de faire, c’est de multiplier les abeilles qui sont naturellement capables de gérer ça.

The Soft Protest Digest :

Peut-être que l’on peut aller un peu plus dans le détail. Tu as abordé la question du Varroa, peut-être peut-on en profiter pour énumérer tout les défis, disons même les horreurs auxquelles font actuellement face les colonies d’abeille. Quels sont les autres problèmes qui touchent les abeilles ?

Julien Perrin :

En réalité, les problèmes des abeilles sont multiples. Le premier problème des pollinisateurs au sens large et des abeilles en particulier, va être l'artificialisation des milieux. Aujourd’hui, il n’y a plus de grande diversité de milieux, donc peu de diversité des fleurs. Avec l’érosion de la biodiversité, on ne trouve plus que des grandes plaines, avec un seul type de fleurs puis plus de fleurs du tout. Aussi, au lieu d’avoir un régime alimentaire diversifié, et une alimentation constante, l’abeille va se retrouver face à des situations telles que : beaucoup d’une fleur, puis plus rien. Pour donner une image, c'est un peu comme si nous nous nourrissions uniquement de salade. La salade est peut-être bonne pour la santé, mais si nous ne n’avons que ça à manger, on se retrouve devant un problème de carence. Il faut se nourrir d’une diversité d’ingrédients. Et c’est une question qui est plus que problématique pour les pollinisateurs. Le manque de disponibilité des ressources alimentaires et l’appauvrissement de sa diversité.
Un autre problème que l’on a est la concurrence de la chimie. Des articles ont prouvé, par exemple, que la mobilité du sperme des mâles diminue chez les abeilles sous l’action de certains produits chimiques et, de ce fait, cela joue directement sur la capacité les abeilles à se reproduire. Mais ces produits peuvent aussi avoir un impact sur leur capacité à se reconnaître dans le milieu. Sachant qu’une petite abeille butine jusqu’à dix km, aussi elle a besoin d'avoir une reconnaissance développée du milieu. Si elle est perturbée, elle peut donc tout simplement se perdre ce qui peut avoir un impact dévastateur sur les colonies.
La mondialisation aussi a permit l’importation d’une multitude de nouveaux problèmes. En apiculture aujourd’hui, penser que les abeilles locales sont les plus adaptées est donc faux. La mondialisation soumet les abeilles locales à des problèmes qu’elles ne connaissent pas. Parmi les plus connus, le Varroa, qui est une sorte d'acarien, de crabe, suce le sang les abeilles. Pour vous donner une image c'est un peu comme dans le film Alien, la petite ventouse qui suce le sang. On l’a comprit, il y a plus agréable.
Il y a aussi d’autres parasites, plus petits cette fois. On va retrouver des bactéries ou des champignons qui vont attaquer le développement du couvain. Les loques américaines entre-autres vont dévaster les colonies d’abeilles.
Plus gros, on a les frelons asiatiques qui vont se poster devant les ruches et qui vont stresser les ruches. Ils ne vont pas réellement manger les abeilles mais leur faire peur. Les abeilles seront tellement effrayées, qu’elles ne sortiront plus pour se nourrir et mourront ensuite de faim.
Après nous avons un problème auquel nous sommes tous confrontés : les changements climatiques. On ne s’en rend peut-être pas forcément compte quand on habite en ville mais nous, à la campagne, on s’en rend compte. Des espèces d'arbres qui étaient avant adaptées à nos climats, soufrent aujourd’hui des sécheresses et des canicules.
Je crois que l’ONF avait fait une petite modélisation afin d’estimer la répartition des hêtres en France. Le résultat de l’étude était désastreux, d’ici 2050, le hêtre aurait presque disparu. L’abeille fait difficilement le poids face à ces bouleversements.

The Soft Protest Digest :

A t-on réussi à savoir exactement d'où venait le varroa ?

Julien Perrin :

Oui. C’est un parasite qui vivait avec une autre espèce d’abeille appelée Apis Cerana. Cette abeille vit depuis longtemps avec le varroa ce qui lui a permit de développer des stratégies de défense. C’est ailleurs une abeille qui ne produit que peu, si ce n’est pas, de miel car elle utilise beaucoup d’énergie pour se défendre.
Le fait est qu’en voulant produire plus de miel, on a exportés des espèces à miel telles que Apis Mellifera vers les pays d’Asie, et du même fait, le varroa s’est greffé sur ces espèces qui ont re-migré vers l’Europe en passant par, la Russie, puis les pays de l’Est pour arriver en France aux alentours de 1986. Donc on voit que le varroa est en France depuis à peu-près trente ans. À l’échelle de l’évolution, c’est une invasion récente à laquelle nos abeilles locales ont des difficultés à réagir. Mon travail va donc être d’identifier les abeilles qui sont naturellement résistantes au parasite, et de les multiplier afin de ne pas à avoir recours à la chimie qui s’attaquerai au problème de manière artificielle.

The Soft Protest Digest :

Tu as évoqué les transhumances russes. Est-ce que tu pourrais nous parler peut-être un peu plus précisément de cette question de la « transhumance des abeilles » et de l'utilisation des abeilles exclusivement pour polliniser des cultures ?

Julien Perrin :

Effectivement c'est quelque chose qui est et deviendra peut-être même malheureusement l'avenir de l'apiculture. Aujourd'hui on se rend compte qu'on a un effondrement drastique de la biodiversité. Pour vous donner un ordre d'idée, 2% des pollinisateurs meurent chaque année. 2% c'est équivalent au volume de la population qui est mort durant la grippe espagnole. Pour nous cette crise a été quelque-chose de catastrophique. C’est ce qui se passe à l'échelle des espèces, chez les pollinisateurs tous les ans, année après année.
Aussi, si l’on considère la biomasse de pollinisateurs, on a perdu à peu-près 76% de cette biomasse. Ça vous le voyez tout les étés quand vous partez en vacances. Avant, la carrosserie de votre voiture était couverte de moustiques et de pollinisateurs écrasés. Aujourd’hui votre voiture est toujours aussi proposer à la fin de votre trajet. La raison étant qu’il n’y a plus de pollinisateurs. Ils ont qu'ils sont quasiment tous morts. Et à l'échelle de la diversité des espèces, on a presque perdu la moitié. Ça c'est le marqueur que l’on a un milieu qui est extrêmement problématique. Aussi, vu que ces pollinisateurs n'existent plus, il existe maintenant un problème de pollinisation. Et c'est un enjeu fondamental car nous avons un tiers de notre régime alimentaire qui dépend de plantes pollinisées. Il faut donc gérer la question, d’autant plus que les pollinisateurs ont un apport eco-systemique, entre d’autres mots, ils aident l’environnement à fonctionner et sont donc responsables de la vie d’autres espèces de plantes, de poissons et encore d’oiseaux. La transhumance signifie que : face à un manque de ressources, les apiculteurs doivent aujourd’hui courir après celles-ci afin que leurs abeilles ne meurent pas de faim, ils doivent donc constamment déplacer leurs ruches. Les agriculteurs quant à eux, doivent aujourd’hui faire appel à des apiculteurs afin qu’ils les aide à polliniser leurs cultures. Ça reste modéré à l’échelle de la France mais aux États-Unis c’est quelque chose qui est colossal. Un apiculteur qui va aider à polliniser les amandiers en Californie va faire à peu près le tour des du pays et permettre de polliniser d'autres cultures au passage comme les cranberries.

Julien Perrin en off :

On récolte 200 reines. On prend des reines dans 200 caisses tous les mardis. Le mercredi on va introduire 200 cellules royales dans les ruches. Le vendredi, on vient lever les cellules. Le samedi on les greffes. Et le dimanche on insémine et ça tout le temps…

The Soft Protest Digest :

Maintenant qu'on a abordé ton activité et, finalement, les problèmes que tu essais de résoudre avec ton élevage d’abeilles Buckfast, j’aimerais qu'on parle plus du cycle de vie des abeilles en général. Ce point de vue rapproché pourrait permettre de créer une forme d’empathie. L’empathie c’est aussi une façon de donner envie aux gens d'agir, et ça passe aussi par la connaissance. On peut, peut-être, commencer par là. On a un œuf qui tombe au fond d'une alvéole. C’est un œuf d'ouvrière. Qu'est-ce qui se passe après ?

Julien Perrin :

Il y a un œuf qui tombe au fond d'une alvéole et c’est œuf n’est pas encore déterminé entre ouvrière et reine. Il va se développer pendant 3 jours et va, après avoir éclôt, être nourrit à la gelée royale. Une fois larve, elle va former une sorte de cocon, un peu comme les papillons. À l’intérieur il y aura une nymphe, qui va ensuite et éclore pour se transformer en abeille adulte. Cette abeille adulte sera soit une ouvrière (les abeilles classiques que l’on connaît), soit une reine (en fonction de la quantité de gelée royale qu'il lui aura été donné). Dans les premiers stades, toutes les abeilles seront nourries à la gelée royale, puis après 3 jours, il y aura un changement et la majorité des larves seront nourries avec un mélange de pollen et de miel alors que les reines seront nourries exclusivement de gelée royale.
C’est fou de voir qu'une substance alimentaire va complètement conditionner les gènes qui vont s'activer dans le développement de l'individu. C’est comme si nous mangions uniquement du pain d'épice et que l’on devenait super costaud. Je n’ai pas du en manger assez !

The Soft Protest Digest :

(sic) Parmi toutes les substances que les abeilles vont produire pour s’alimenter, on retrouve, si j’ai bien compris : la gelée royale, le miel et le pollen. On sait que le miel est issu du nectar des fleurs et que le pollen en provient aussi. Mais comment est produit la gelée royale ?

Julien Perrin :

En fait, les abeilles vont se nourrir exclusivement de pollen et de miel. Avec leurs glandes, elles vont sécréter une substance qui va être la gelée royale. Nous sécrétons dans notre corps beaucoup de substances : des sucs pancréatiques pour la digestion, la salive qui permet de digérer l’amidon, etc… Les abeilles elles aussi vont secréter une substance qui servira d’alimentation enrichie et spécifique au bon développement des reines.

The Soft Protest Digest :

Ces abeilles qui vont d’ailleurs sécréter de la gelée royale c’est que l’on appelle des nourrices. Est-ce que tu peux nous expliquer les différents rôles que peuvent avoir les ouvrières au cours de leur vie.

Julien Perrin :

En fait il existe plusieurs échelles de spécialisation dans la ruche. On va voir une spécialisation de caste en fonction du sexe et des types d’individus. On a les ouvrières classiques, qui vont travailler et que tout le monde connait. On a la reine qui va avoir une fonction de ponte et non pas de pouvoir décisionnel. On va retrouver aussi les mâles qui vont avoir une fonction de reproduction et qui vont uniquement servir à féconder les reines au moment opportun.
Il y a aussi une spécialisation temporelle, tout particulièrement chez les ouvrières. Celles-ci vont être nourrices quand elles seront jeunes, puis vont passer par plusieurs stades qui, une fois vieilles leur permettront d’être butineuses ou même exploratrices. Les butineuses les plus spécialisées vont aller chercher la ressource.
La raison pour laquelle j’ai présenté brièvement le passage de toutes les castes, c'est parce que qu’il est intéressant de voir qu’au cours de l’évolution, l’abeille s’est développée afin que le fait de prendre des risques à l’extérieur se fasse dans les stades les plus âgées. Et à l’inverse, le fait de s'occuper de l'intérieur de la ruche et à proximité de la colonie en sécurité se fait chez plus jeunes. C’est assez jolie en réalité. On voit comment, au fur et à mesure, l'évolution a sculpté le fonctionnent d’une ruche.

The Soft Protest Digest :

C’est autour de quel âge que l’abeille va se retrouver dehors pour explorer et trouver de nouvelles ressources ?

Julien Perrin :

En fait, il se passe 21 jours entre la ponte et la naissance d'une ouvrière. Et à nouveau 21 jours entre leur naissance et la sortie du couvain. Il ne faut pas prendre ses chiffres comme des absolues bien entendu car la ruche a une certaine plasticité. Si on enlève toutes les butineuses d’une ruche par exemple, des abeilles jeunes pourront devenir butineuses et inversement, si l’on enlève toutes les jeunes, les abeilles vieilles pourront redevenir nourrices. Donc on a 21 jours dans le couvain, 21 jours à l’intérieur de la ruche et encore globalement 21 jours en tant que butineuses. Leur longévité va être variable. Ça dépend des conditions météorologiques, de l'environnement, de la saison. Les abeilles qui naissent en saison, c’est-à-dire au mois de juin/juillet, vont avoir une vie courte parce qu’elles vont beaucoup travailler. Par contre, les abeilles qui vont naitre à la fin de l'été et durant l'automne vont alors survivre tout l'hiver et avoir une plus longue durée de vie. Ce qui est joli c'est que la température à laquelle les abeilles vont être élevées quand elles sont petites, va modifier l'expression de leurs gènes, et vont avoir un impact sur leur métabolisme. Plus de gras pour pour tenir l'hiver par exemple. Tous les paramètres environnementaux vont donc vraiment jouer dans le développement de l'abeille et sur ses capacités de résistance à l’environnement. Ce sont des mécanismes d’anticipation qui ont été sélectionnés au cours du temps.

The Soft Protest Digest :

Je pense que l’on peut quand même un peu aller plus dans les détails des autres spécialisations que l’on retrouve entre l'état de nourrice et d’exploratrice. J’avais trouvé incroyable cette façon que les abeilles avaient de sécréter une cire sur leur abdomen, ce qui leur permettait finalement de construire leur habitat elles-mêmes.

Julien Perrin :

Effectivement il y a plusieurs plusieurs tâches que les ouvrières réalisent. Les nourrices vont s'occuper de ce qu'on appelle le couvain, des « bébés abeilles ». On va aussi avoir des abeilles qui vont nettoyer. Et on retrouve aussi des « cirières » qui sont globalement des abeilles jeunes et qui ont un joli mécanisme.
Les abeilles se nourrissent en grande partie de sucre. Un peu comme si nous nous nourrissons principalement de soda. Chez les humains, la trop grande consommation de sucre provoque un grave problème que l’on appelle l'obésité. Mais chez les abeilles, l’évolution a fait qu’elles ont réussi à détourner le problème en transformant le surplus de gras en un produit que l’on appelle la cire. À partir de cette graisse, elles vont sculpter tous les rayons qui vont permettre le développement du couvain et vont leur permettre aussi de voter. Garder la reine ou la changer. Les abeilles ont la capacité de choisir de remplacer la reine si besoin. Dans le cas où la reine serait moins bonne, chacune des abeilles empilent des copeaux de cire afin de former une cellule royale de forme particulière. Quand la reine déficiente va y placer un œuf, les nourrices vont le nourrir uniquement de gelée royale ce qui le fera devenir une reine.
La cire c’est quelque chose de passionnant. Ça a des propriétés de conduction des vibrations qui permettent aux abeilles de pouvoir communiquer entre elles. C’est d'ailleurs un problème grave dans la filière car on sait qu'aujourd'hui c'est cires sont parfois adultérées avec d'autres produits. Ces produits perturbent la communication ce qui peut avoir des impacts forts sur le développement des larves, la résistance des rayons, etc. C’est une grosse grosse problématique que l’on a actuellement.

The Soft Protest Digest :

Pendant qu'on parle de cire. Peut-être peut-on aussi parler de la façon complètement dingue dont la ruche est utilisée par les ouvrières comme une sorte de carte. Elle leur permet, en réalisant différentes danses, de donner des informations très précises à leurs sœurs ouvrières, et plus particulièrement aux butineuses afin de trouver l'emplacement exact d'une source de nourriture. Elles peuvent alors concentrer les efforts de la ruche sur un endroit en particulier. C’est bien ça ?

Julien Perrin :

Oui. La cire est travaillée de manière spécifique pour donner la forme aux rayons. C’est très jolie. Les abeilles vont assembler des petites écailles de cire autour d'elles pour former des ronds de cire. Ces ronds, accolés les uns aux autres, vont donner forme à des hexagones. C’est un peu comme si nous collions des bulles de savon dans une baignoire. C’est une forme stable qui se crée de manière thermodynamique. Ce ne sont pas les abeilles qui vont sculpter les rayons directement. Elles vont seulement s’en remettre aux qualités spécifiques de la cire qui a un point de fusion bien particulier et qui va permettre de former cette structure complexe. Et la cire repose sur un équilibre très fin. Il faut que ça soit plastique, mais si c'est trop plastique ça tombe donc l'importance d’avoir des cires de bonne qualité est fondamentale.
Il y a sur le dessus des alvéoles d'abeille une sorte de petit bourrelet de cire relativement épais. Il va permettre aux vibrations de passer. Sachant qu’il y a peu de lumière dans la ruche, ce bourrelet va servir de cable de communication. Aussi, les abeilles vont réaliser des danses pour indiquer où se trouve la ressource et les diffuser dans la ruche. Ces danses sont conçues suivant plusieurs facteurs. Quand les abeilles sortent de la ruche elle peuvent connaître la position du soleil. En rentrant à la ruche elles vont donc communiquer la position des ressources via la position du soleil. Sachant qu’il n’y pas de lumière dans la ruche, elle vont considérer que le soleil se trouve en haut du cadre. Elle vont voleter en forme de 8, et l’axe central du 8 va indiquer la direction par rapport au soleil, et le nombre de frétillement sur cet axe va indiquer la distance. Pourquoi des frétillements ? On comprend bien qu’une abeille qui est allée très loin a beaucoup volé et à beaucoup bougé. Aussi, elle exprime cette effort dans sa danse : « il faut beaucoup bouger, beaucoup bouger ». Et il va falloir aussi qu’elle communique la qualité de la ressource. Elle va donc garder une petite goutte de nectar dans sa bouche qu'elle va faire gouter aux abeilles qui sont venus voir sa danse afin qu’elles déterminent si la ressource est bonne ou si elle ne l’est pas.:Ce sont des véritables mécanismes de contrôle qui vont permettront de se rendre compte si certains nectars sont toxiques.

The Soft Protest Digest :

Est-ce que tu peux nous expliquer qu'est-ce que c'est en réalité le pollen et le miel ?

Julien Perrin :

Le miel provient en fait du nectar que produisent les végétaux. Ce nectar est une solution sucrée relativement riche en eau. Les abeilles vont apporter ce nectar à l'intérieur de la ruche dans leurs jabots, l’enrichir avec des enzymes puis le sécher en le ventilant, ce qui va réduire la quantité d’eau. Ce processus va donner un produit encore un peu vivant : le miel. Le miel peut aussi ne pas provenir de fleurs et être issu de miellat. Ce sont des petites gouttes de solution sucrée que les pucerons vont produire en suçant la sève des arbres ou des plantes et que les abeilles vont pouvoir récupérer afin de produire du miel. Ça c’est pour le miel. Et la raison pour laquelle je dit que le miel est un produit vivant est qu’il contient une variété d’enzymes qui ont besoin de conditions de température particulières pour pouvoir s’activer.
Et on a encore plus vivant : le pollen. Le pollen va être l'équivalent, chez les fleurs, du sperme ou des gamètes. Les abeilles vont y ajouter du miel afin de l’agglomérer, d’en faire des petites pelotes. Ce qui est très intéressant c’est qu’elles vont y ajouter toute une fleur de micro-organismes qui vont être des bactéries et de levures et qui vont en fait fermenter le pollen, un peu comme un choucroute. Ça va permettre au pollen d’être plus digeste et d’être plus riches en nutriments. Le pollen, c'est l’équivalent des protéines chez les abeilles, c'est l'équivalent d’un steak pour nous. Mais c’est aussi tout un microbiote. Quand on consomme du vinaigre de cidre et qu'on y voit une mère, une sorte de yaourt, c'est en réalité une source de micro-organismes essentiels au bon fonctionnement de notre corps. Le pollen va va donc permettre aux abeilles d’enrichir positivement leurs microbiote.

The Soft Protest Digest :

Maintenant que l’on a développé le cycle de vie d’une ouvrière, j’aimerais revenir au role de la reine que tu as abordé quand tu évoquais la façon dont les abeilles se développent dans le couvain. Est-ce que tu pourrais m'expliquer, en partant de ce système de vote, l'existence d'une reine. Que devient-elle alors qu’elle sort du cocon, quand elle n'est une nymphe encore non-fécondé ? Comment va t’elle être fécondée et quel va être son mode de vie après la fécondation ?

Julien Perrin :

Comme on l'a vu tout à l'heure, un reine c’est un œuf femelle qui pourrait devenir soit ouvrière, soit reine et qui va être nourri de manière préférentielle en gelée royale pour une raison simple : la forme particulière de sa cellule. Au lieu de se développer en 21 jours, elle va se développer en 16 jours et naîtra vierge. Uu bout d'une semaine, elle va sortir de la ruche pour, dans un premier temps, connaître la position de la ruche dans son environnement et, dans un second temps, se faire féconder. Elle va se faire féconder dans des lieux particuliers, des plateaux de fécondation dans lesquels les reines vont rencontrer les mâles. Elles sont alors accompagnées d’une sorte d’escorte qui va les accompagner. Ensuite quand on parle de fécondation, ce n’est pas tout à fait exact, c’est en fait une copulation. On l’a vu tout à l’heure, la fécondation se fait au niveau de l’œuf. Les mâles vont donc copuler avec les reines et leur penis, qui est quasiment aussi gros que leur corps, va rester coincé. Ils vont donc se retirer, s’arracher au passage le penis et mourir. Les reines elles vont s’arracher chacun des penis pour pouvoir se faire féconder de nombreuses fois, en moyenne douze fois, bien que ça puisse varier. Il y a alors une vraie compétition entre les mâles qui se joue. En laissant leur penis dans les femelles, ils vont bloquer l’accès à leur appareil reproducteur aux autres mâles. Ils vont aussi bloquer la migration de d’autres spermes dans le corps de la reine en mélangeant le leur avec du mucus.
En rentrant à la ruche, le sperme collecté par la reine migrera vers une petite poche interne qui s'appelle la « spermathèque ». C’est pour ça que le terme de fécondation est là vraiment impropre. On parle de fécondation quand un spermatozoïde rentre en contact avec un ovule. Là ce n’est pas le cas. La reine engrange du sperme qu’elle distribuera tout au long de sa vie. Cette migration du sperme vers la spermathèque prendra environ entre 3 jours et 1 semaine, selon les conditions météorologiques. La reine commencera alors à pondre jusqu’à trois mille œufs par jours et ce toute sa vie. La reine est donc une uniquement une machine à pondre des œufs. Cette « machine à pondre » va faire valoir qu’elle est de bonne qualité en diffusant à une odeur très agréable. Elle diffuse son odeur dans la colonie comme un signal de présence et de qualité.
Mais au fur et à mesure du temps, le sperme va perdre en qualité et s’épuiser. La reine va tenter d’inséminer les œufs avec de moins en moins de succès et perdre de son odeur. C’est donc dans ces conditions là que les ouvrières vont décider de la changer.

The Soft Protest Digest :

Combien de temps vit la reine en général ?

Julien Perrin :

Ça c'est quelque chose qu'on a vraiment vu évoluer. Avant les reines pouvaient vivre 5 ans. C’est ce que mon grand père me racontait. Aujourd’hui elles vivent de 2 à 3 ans. Pourquoi ? C’est qu’elles évoluent dans un environnement qui est de plus en plus compliqué. On a notamment une baisse de qualité du sperme, et c’est le cas chez les humains aussi. Le sperme que les reines gardent dans leur spermathèque est de moins bonne qualité et celles-ci vont donc être remplacées plus souvent.

The Soft Protest Digest :

Pour finir, on sait que l’abeille est un pollinisateur que l’on a quasi-domestiqué. Tu me parlais d'une vraie domestication, vu que tu gères aussi leur reproduction. Est- ce que l’abeille et l’apiculture en général a un impact qui est positif ou un impact négatif sur les autres pollinisateurs ?

Julien Perrin :

Il y a plusieurs plusieurs schémas. Effectivement, les abeilles peuvent parfois être en compétition avec d’autres pollinisateurs. Mais dans tous les cas, chacune des actions que les apiculteurs vont mettre en place pour préserver le milieu, et donc préserver leurs abeilles, vont avoir un impact positif sur tous les autres pollinisateurs.
Et d’un point de vue de la biodiversité, il y a quelque chose qui est important à l'échelle de l’abeille. Si, effectivement, demain on a une abeille qui est produite par des grandes sociétés de bio-technologie et qui est diffusée aux apiculteurs un peu partout dans le monde, comme certaines variétés de blé par exemple. On aura alors une biodiversité catastrophique. Et c’est c’est pour cela que l’on milite. On veut qu’il y ai une grande diversité d’éleveurs qui sélectionnent une abeille qui corresponde aux besoins du milieu et qui la multiplie. Ça demande beaucoup d'énergie mais ça permet d’avoir une variété de points de vue qui peuvent faire exister une véritable diversité génétique. Il faut empêcher que des grandes firmes de bio-technologie maitrise l’abeille, mettent la main dessus et nous fasse perdre la diversité.

Conclusion

Merci d’avoir écouté “Une abeille open-source pour un environnement empoisonné”. Vous pouvez retrouver l’épisode ainsi que d’autres podcasts sur l’application du même nom ou sur SoundCloud avec le mot-clé “The Soft Protest Digest”. Vous pouvez aussi vous rendre sur notre wikipedia www.thesoftprotestdigest.org pour plus d’informations.

Notes

  1. Paris, France.
  2. The conginitive perception of the environment by a given specie