Ecology of the dutch + Rhizosphere

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‘Ecology of the dutch + Rhizosphere’

The “Ecology of the dutch + Rhizosphere” were served to the diners of the “Waarom beginnen met Stamppot?” dinner party.

This starter consisted of øllebrød (porridge made out of beer, bread and salt eaten in Denmark for more than 800 years), knækbrød (cracker made of flaxseedand chia seeds), steamed and caramelized orange turnip, lemon/pepper buttermilk, garnished with foraged edible weeds and flowers: yarrow (duizendblad in dutch) flower and leaves, wild mustard flower and nasturtium leaves.

Excerpt of the introduction given to the diners

“The dish is an ode to microbial life in the soil, the many many workers whom sustainable food-production is co-dependent on. Microbial colonies of fungi and bacteria are variable according to circumstances, and constitutes a large specimen of a complete natural environment. We represented parts of the dutch microbial life in our very first dish presented at the “Waarom beginnen met Stamppot?“ dinner. The first rhizospheric zone was made of a danish inspired recipe called ‘øllebrød’, a porridge made out of beer, bread and salt eaten in Denmark for more than 800 years. The spontaneous fermented flemish beer made with wild muckwort (bijwoet), and the dutch sourdough ryebread both need beneficial bacteria in order to ferment. The second rhizopheric zone consisted of a form of a cracker (knækbrød) made of flaxseed (lijnzaad) and chia seeds (chiazaden), which is two interesting crops in terms of climate distress. Both seeds are high in fiber and omega 3 essential fatty acids, and protein (chia seeds), especially good to implement in a meat-free diet. Additionally, both crops are very robust in terms of drought and nutrients deficiency, especially chia seeds which are probably soon to be grown in Europe. A steamed and caramelized orange turnip was the centerpiece of the dish together with an lemon/pepper buttermilk, and finally garnished with foraged edible weeds and flowers: yarrow (duizendblad) flower and leaves, wild mustard flower and nasturtium leaves.”

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